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Flying stories

 
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johngilpin



Joined: 23 Mar 2011
Posts: 84
Location: 004

PostPosted: Sat Dec 30, 2017 11:04 pm    Post subject: Flying stories Reply with quote

I've posted on this before, but haven't noticed any action.....

John Hauck needs to write up some of his extensive flying adventures. And he certainly does have plenty of great flying adventures to tell. We've only heard bits and pieces but it does need to be put together and published. 
It's not all that hard these days. There are several formats and programs, but the easiest I've found is the Google Blogger that I used. It's set up as a blog so that the latest post ends up at the front and the beginning at the end, not like a good story. So what I've come up with is to do the whole story in one post. Just start with a post and then keep adding to the story and updating that same post. I've put as many as 200 photos and long story in the one post, built over time, and it seems to work OK. I'm no expert in such work, but I find it really easy to write and edit and add photos in Blogger. And the price is right, free....
Come on John, do it while you can. 
You've got so much to tell. 
And we know you have the ability to tell a good story....
Maybe if everyone pushed on him..........
JG


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DANIELBINDL



Joined: 17 Apr 2013
Posts: 4
Location: New Smyrna, FL

PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2017 5:25 am    Post subject: Flying stories Reply with quote

John Hauck (WISDOM) come on john, we are not going to get any younger. And some times, for some of us, when we get older, we may not remember as well, as when we were younger, and more adventure some. 
Happy New John, and thanks for all the sharing, and that goes for all of our KOLBER'S!!!!!
On Sun, Dec 31, 2017 at 2:03 AM, JC Gilpin <j.gilpin(at)bigpond.com (j.gilpin(at)bigpond.com)> wrote:
Quote:
I've posted on this before, but haven't noticed any action.....

John Hauck needs to write up some of his extensive flying adventures. And he certainly does have plenty of great flying adventures to tell. We've only heard bits and pieces but it does need to be put together and published. 
It's not all that hard these days. There are several formats and programs, but the easiest I've found is the Google Blogger that I used. It's set up as a blog so that the latest post ends up at the front and the beginning at the end, not like a good story. So what I've come up with is to do the whole story in one post. Just start with a post and then keep adding to the story and updating that same post. I've put as many as 200 photos and long story in the one post, built over time, and it seems to work OK. I'm no expert in such work, but I find it really easy to write and edit and add photos in Blogger. And the price is right, free....
Come on John, do it while you can. 
You've got so much to tell. 
And we know you have the ability to tell a good story....
Maybe if everyone pushed on him...........
JG



--
Daniel Bindl


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John Hauck



Joined: 09 Jan 2006
Posts: 4431
Location: Titus, Alabama (hauck's holler)

PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2017 6:31 am    Post subject: Flying stories Reply with quote

John G/Kolbers,

I used to remember every town I flew to on my flight around the country and up to Deadhorse, AK, in 1994.  I had studied and lived that flight so much that the info was burned into my head.  Never forget a detail.  That was 24 years ago and I have forgotten a few things here and there, but I have my log books to use for reference, and maps, and most of it comes flooding back.

My life certainly has not been normal compared to others, but to me it was just as normal as everyone else's.  I figured most UL pilots thought the same way I did, airplanes are made to go places.  The further away from home the better.  I couldn't understand why they didn't want to fly with me to these faraway places.  Two weeks after I built my Ultrastar I flew down to Tallahassee, FL.  A flight that was, for the most part, unheard of in 1984.  Was 250 miles in a very open cockpit.  That was just the beginning.  No GPS back then, pilotage and DED reckoning.  Mag compass and a sectional.  I was comfortable with that form of navigation, having used it to fly in VN and the States.  That was our primary form of navigation in VN.  Flying the Ultrastar I had to study my sectional, memorize the heading and distance, fold the map and sit on it before my next takeoff and until my next landing so I could take another look.  We've come a long ways since then.  In the Firestar and MKIII I could keep the sectional in the cockpit with me to look at as often as I wanted to.  That was really an advancement.

I like the idea of the Google Blogger.  I'll have to investigate.

Happy New Year to all my Kolb friends.  We, Miss P'fer and me, have meet so many really fine people over the years, through these little airplanes, that I would have never known otherwise. 

Fly safe,

john h
mkIII
Titus, Alabama



From: owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com [mailto:owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com] On Behalf Of JC Gilpin
Sent: Sunday, December 31, 2017 1:04 AM
To: kolb-list(at)matronics.com
Subject: Flying stories


I've posted on this before, but haven't noticed any action.....


John Hauck needs to write up some of his extensive flying adventures. And he certainly does have plenty of great flying adventures to tell. We've only heard bits and pieces but it does need to be put together and published.



It's not all that hard these days. There are several formats and programs, but the easiest I've found is the Google Blogger that I used. It's set up as a blog so that the latest post ends up at the front and the beginning at the end, not like a good story. So what I've come up with is to do the whole story in one post. Just start with a post and then keep adding to the story and updating that same post. I've put as many as 200 photos and long story in the one post, built over time, and it seems to work OK. I'm no expert in such work, but I find it really easy to write and edit and add photos in Blogger. And the price is right, free....



Come on John, do it while you can.

You've got so much to tell.

And we know you have the ability to tell a good story....



Maybe if everyone pushed on him...........



JG


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John Hauck
MKIII/912ULS
hauck's holler
Titus, Alabama
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2017 7:43 am    Post subject: Flying stories Reply with quote

High John I’m not a kolber just a plane Jane pilot. Enjoyed the short stories. Thanks, where are you living I thought I saw something about Australia? God Bless you and Happy New Year!

Robert Lobdell
Waskom, Texas

Flying is the second greatest thrill known to man. Landing is the first!

On Dec 31, 2017, at 8:31 AM, John Hauck <jhauck(at)elmore.rr.com (jhauck(at)elmore.rr.com)> wrote:
Quote:
<![endif]--> <![endif]-->
John G/Kolbers,

I used to remember every town I flew to on my flight around the country and up to Deadhorse, AK, in 1994. I had studied and lived that flight so much that the info was burned into my head. Never forget a detail. That was 24 years ago and I have forgotten a few things here and there, but I have my log books to use for reference, and maps, and most of it comes flooding back.

My life certainly has not been normal compared to others, but to me it was just as normal as everyone else's. I figured most UL pilots thought the same way I did, airplanes are made to go places. The further away from home the better. I couldn't understand why they didn't want to fly with me to these faraway places. Two weeks after I built my Ultrastar I flew down to Tallahassee, FL. A flight that was, for the most part, unheard of in 1984. Was 250 miles in a very open cockpit. That was just the beginning. No GPS back then, pilotage and DED reckoning. Mag compass and a sectional. I was comfortable with that form of navigation, having used it to fly in VN and the States. That was our primary form of navigation in VN. Flying the Ultrastar I had to study my sectional, memorize the heading and distance, fold the map and sit on it before my next takeoff and until my next landing so I could take another look. We've come a long ways since then. In the Firestar and MKIII I could keep the sectional in the cockpit with me to look at as often as I wanted to. That was really an advancement.

I like the idea of the Google Blogger. I'll have to investigate.

Happy New Year to all my Kolb friends. We, Miss P'fer and me, have meet so many really fine people over the years, through these little airplanes, that I would have never known otherwise.

Fly safe,

john h
mkIII
Titus, Alabama



From: owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com (owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com) [mailto:owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com (owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com)] On Behalf Of JC Gilpin
Sent: Sunday, December 31, 2017 1:04 AM
To: kolb-list(at)matronics.com (kolb-list(at)matronics.com)
Subject: Flying stories


I've posted on this before, but haven't noticed any action.....


John Hauck needs to write up some of his extensive flying adventures. And he certainly does have plenty of great flying adventures to tell. We've only heard bits and pieces but it does need to be put together and published.



It's not all that hard these days. There are several formats and programs, but the easiest I've found is the Google Blogger that I used. It's set up as a blog so that the latest post ends up at the front and the beginning at the end, not like a good story. So what I've come up with is to do the whole story in one post. Just start with a post and then keep adding to the story and updating that same post. I've put as many as 200 photos and long story in the one post, built over time, and it seems to work OK. I'm no expert in such work, but I find it really easy to write and edit and add photos in Blogger. And the price is right, free....



Come on John, do it while you can.

You've got so much to tell.

And we know you have the ability to tell a good story....



Maybe if everyone pushed on him...........



JG



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Use the List Feature Navigator to browse the many List utilities available such as the Email Subscriptions page, Archive Search & Download, 7-Day Browse, Chat, FAQ, Photoshare, and much more:

http://www.matronics.com/Navigator?Kolb-List
Back to top
robpen5557(at)gmail.com
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2017 7:44 am    Post subject: Flying stories Reply with quote

Never mind I saw it at the end Titus Alabama, not all that far from me.

Robert Lobdell
Waskom, Texas

Flying is the second greatest thrill known to man. Landing is the first!

On Dec 31, 2017, at 8:31 AM, John Hauck <jhauck(at)elmore.rr.com (jhauck(at)elmore.rr.com)> wrote:
Quote:
<![endif]--> <![endif]-->
John G/Kolbers,

I used to remember every town I flew to on my flight around the country and up to Deadhorse, AK, in 1994. I had studied and lived that flight so much that the info was burned into my head. Never forget a detail. That was 24 years ago and I have forgotten a few things here and there, but I have my log books to use for reference, and maps, and most of it comes flooding back.

My life certainly has not been normal compared to others, but to me it was just as normal as everyone else's. I figured most UL pilots thought the same way I did, airplanes are made to go places. The further away from home the better. I couldn't understand why they didn't want to fly with me to these faraway places. Two weeks after I built my Ultrastar I flew down to Tallahassee, FL. A flight that was, for the most part, unheard of in 1984. Was 250 miles in a very open cockpit. That was just the beginning. No GPS back then, pilotage and DED reckoning. Mag compass and a sectional. I was comfortable with that form of navigation, having used it to fly in VN and the States. That was our primary form of navigation in VN. Flying the Ultrastar I had to study my sectional, memorize the heading and distance, fold the map and sit on it before my next takeoff and until my next landing so I could take another look. We've come a long ways since then. In the Firestar and MKIII I could keep the sectional in the cockpit with me to look at as often as I wanted to. That was really an advancement.

I like the idea of the Google Blogger. I'll have to investigate.

Happy New Year to all my Kolb friends. We, Miss P'fer and me, have meet so many really fine people over the years, through these little airplanes, that I would have never known otherwise.

Fly safe,

john h
mkIII
Titus, Alabama



From: owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com (owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com) [mailto:owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com (owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com)] On Behalf Of JC Gilpin
Sent: Sunday, December 31, 2017 1:04 AM
To: kolb-list(at)matronics.com (kolb-list(at)matronics.com)
Subject: Flying stories


I've posted on this before, but haven't noticed any action.....


John Hauck needs to write up some of his extensive flying adventures. And he certainly does have plenty of great flying adventures to tell. We've only heard bits and pieces but it does need to be put together and published.



It's not all that hard these days. There are several formats and programs, but the easiest I've found is the Google Blogger that I used. It's set up as a blog so that the latest post ends up at the front and the beginning at the end, not like a good story. So what I've come up with is to do the whole story in one post. Just start with a post and then keep adding to the story and updating that same post. I've put as many as 200 photos and long story in the one post, built over time, and it seems to work OK. I'm no expert in such work, but I find it really easy to write and edit and add photos in Blogger. And the price is right, free....



Come on John, do it while you can.

You've got so much to tell.

And we know you have the ability to tell a good story....



Maybe if everyone pushed on him...........



JG



- The Matronics Kolb-List Email Forum -
 

Use the List Feature Navigator to browse the many List utilities available such as the Email Subscriptions page, Archive Search & Download, 7-Day Browse, Chat, FAQ, Photoshare, and much more:

http://www.matronics.com/Navigator?Kolb-List
Back to top
John Hauck



Joined: 09 Jan 2006
Posts: 4431
Location: Titus, Alabama (hauck's holler)

PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2017 7:48 am    Post subject: Flying stories Reply with quote

John Gilpin is in Australia.

john h
mkIII
Titus, Alabama

From: owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com [mailto:owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com] On Behalf Of Robert Lobdell
Sent: Sunday, December 31, 2017 9:43 AM
To: kolb-list(at)matronics.com
Subject: Re: Flying stories

High John I’m not a kolber just a plane Jane pilot. Enjoyed the short stories. Thanks, where are you living I thought I saw something about Australia? God Bless you and Happy New Year!


Robert Lobdell

Waskom, Texas
Flying is the second greatest thrill known to man. Landing is the first!
On Dec 31, 2017, at 8:31 AM, John Hauck <jhauck(at)elmore.rr.com (jhauck(at)elmore.rr.com)> wrote:
Quote:

John G/Kolbers,

I used to remember every town I flew to on my flight around the country and up to Deadhorse, AK, in 1994. I had studied and lived that flight so much that the info was burned into my head. Never forget a detail. That was 24 years ago and I have forgotten a few things here and there, but I have my log books to use for reference, and maps, and most of it comes flooding back.

My life certainly has not been normal compared to others, but to me it was just as normal as everyone else's. I figured most UL pilots thought the same way I did, airplanes are made to go places. The further away from home the better. I couldn't understand why they didn't want to fly with me to these faraway places. Two weeks after I built my Ultrastar I flew down to Tallahassee, FL. A flight that was, for the most part, unheard of in 1984. Was 250 miles in a very open cockpit. That was just the beginning. No GPS back then, pilotage and DED reckoning. Mag compass and a sectional. I was comfortable with that form of navigation, having used it to fly in VN and the States. That was our primary form of navigation in VN. Flying the Ultrastar I had to study my sectional, memorize the heading and distance, fold the map and sit on it before my next takeoff and until my next landing so I could take another look. We've come a long ways since then. In the Firestar and MKIII I could keep the sectional in the cockpit with me to look at as often as I wanted to. That was really an advancement.

I like the idea of the Google Blogger. I'll have to investigate.

Happy New Year to all my Kolb friends. We, Miss P'fer and me, have meet so many really fine people over the years, through these little airplanes, that I would have never known otherwise.

Fly safe,

john h
mkIII
Titus, Alabama



From: owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com (owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com) [mailto:owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com (owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com)] On Behalf Of JC Gilpin
Sent: Sunday, December 31, 2017 1:04 AM
To: kolb-list(at)matronics.com (kolb-list(at)matronics.com)
Subject: Flying stories


I've posted on this before, but haven't noticed any action.....


John Hauck needs to write up some of his extensive flying adventures. And he certainly does have plenty of great flying adventures to tell. We've only heard bits and pieces but it does need to be put together and published.



It's not all that hard these days. There are several formats and programs, but the easiest I've found is the Google Blogger that I used. It's set up as a blog so that the latest post ends up at the front and the beginning at the end, not like a good story. So what I've come up with is to do the whole story in one post. Just start with a post and then keep adding to the story and updating that same post. I've put as many as 200 photos and long story in the one post, built over time, and it seems to work OK. I'm no expert in such work, but I find it really easy to write and edit and add photos in Blogger. And the price is right, free....



Come on John, do it while you can.

You've got so much to tell.

And we know you have the ability to tell a good story....



Maybe if everyone pushed on him...........



JG


- The Matronics Kolb-List Email Forum -
 

Use the List Feature Navigator to browse the many List utilities available such as the Email Subscriptions page, Archive Search & Download, 7-Day Browse, Chat, FAQ, Photoshare, and much more:

http://www.matronics.com/Navigator?Kolb-List

_________________
John Hauck
MKIII/912ULS
hauck's holler
Titus, Alabama
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robpen5557(at)gmail.com
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2017 11:50 am    Post subject: Flying stories Reply with quote

Okay two Johns, I one John Gilpin in Australia. The other John Hauck in Alabama. I think. I. got it. Straight. . . One john talking about another John. It would appear that both Johns have their share of stories. . . Don’t we all. Maybe not as colorful, stories none the less.

Robert Lobdell
Waskom, TX
Only 8 hours flying time to Titus. . In an Aeronca Chief!

Flying is the second greatest thrill known to man. Landing is the first!

On Dec 31, 2017, at 9:48 AM, John Hauck <jhauck(at)elmore.rr.com (jhauck(at)elmore.rr.com)> wrote:
Quote:
<![endif]--> <![endif]-->
John Gilpin is in Australia.

john h
mkIII
Titus, Alabama

From: owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com (owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com) [mailto:owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com (owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com)] On Behalf Of Robert Lobdell
Sent: Sunday, December 31, 2017 9:43 AM
To: kolb-list(at)matronics.com (kolb-list(at)matronics.com)
Subject: Re: Flying stories

High John I’m not a kolber just a plane Jane pilot. Enjoyed the short stories. Thanks, where are you living I thought I saw something about Australia? God Bless you and Happy New Year!


Robert Lobdell

Waskom, Texas
Flying is the second greatest thrill known to man. Landing is the first!
On Dec 31, 2017, at 8:31 AM, John Hauck <jhauck(at)elmore.rr.com (jhauck(at)elmore.rr.com)> wrote:
Quote:

John G/Kolbers,

I used to remember every town I flew to on my flight around the country and up to Deadhorse, AK, in 1994. I had studied and lived that flight so much that the info was burned into my head. Never forget a detail. That was 24 years ago and I have forgotten a few things here and there, but I have my log books to use for reference, and maps, and most of it comes flooding back.

My life certainly has not been normal compared to others, but to me it was just as normal as everyone else's. I figured most UL pilots thought the same way I did, airplanes are made to go places. The further away from home the better. I couldn't understand why they didn't want to fly with me to these faraway places. Two weeks after I built my Ultrastar I flew down to Tallahassee, FL. A flight that was, for the most part, unheard of in 1984. Was 250 miles in a very open cockpit. That was just the beginning. No GPS back then, pilotage and DED reckoning. Mag compass and a sectional. I was comfortable with that form of navigation, having used it to fly in VN and the States. That was our primary form of navigation in VN. Flying the Ultrastar I had to study my sectional, memorize the heading and distance, fold the map and sit on it before my next takeoff and until my next landing so I could take another look. We've come a long ways since then. In the Firestar and MKIII I could keep the sectional in the cockpit with me to look at as often as I wanted to. That was really an advancement.

I like the idea of the Google Blogger. I'll have to investigate.

Happy New Year to all my Kolb friends. We, Miss P'fer and me, have meet so many really fine people over the years, through these little airplanes, that I would have never known otherwise.

Fly safe,

john h
mkIII
Titus, Alabama



From: owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com (owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com) [mailto:owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com (owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com)] On Behalf Of JC Gilpin
Sent: Sunday, December 31, 2017 1:04 AM
To: kolb-list(at)matronics.com (kolb-list(at)matronics.com)
Subject: Flying stories


I've posted on this before, but haven't noticed any action.....


John Hauck needs to write up some of his extensive flying adventures. And he certainly does have plenty of great flying adventures to tell. We've only heard bits and pieces but it does need to be put together and published.



It's not all that hard these days. There are several formats and programs, but the easiest I've found is the Google Blogger that I used. It's set up as a blog so that the latest post ends up at the front and the beginning at the end, not like a good story. So what I've come up with is to do the whole story in one post. Just start with a post and then keep adding to the story and updating that same post. I've put as many as 200 photos and long story in the one post, built over time, and it seems to work OK. I'm no expert in such work, but I find it really easy to write and edit and add photos in Blogger. And the price is right, free....



Come on John, do it while you can.

You've got so much to tell.

And we know you have the ability to tell a good story....



Maybe if everyone pushed on him...........



JG



- The Matronics Kolb-List Email Forum -
 

Use the List Feature Navigator to browse the many List utilities available such as the Email Subscriptions page, Archive Search & Download, 7-Day Browse, Chat, FAQ, Photoshare, and much more:

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Back to top
johngilpin



Joined: 23 Mar 2011
Posts: 84
Location: 004

PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 4:23 am    Post subject: Flying Stories Reply with quote

Quote:

<When I made that comment, "you were good at getting into and out of trouble", I was thinking in particular, to the story you told of clipping a power line and the adventure that started after that. Very funny once in a lifetime story.>


Well, I guess that's bait enough to tell the story as it happened..... Yeh, it did turn out funny in the end.....
And maybe remind others of precautions that need to be heeded.....

I'd converted a two-seat Beaver RX550 into a single-seat, twin engine push-pull arrangement, with two 447's. I was looking for redundancy so I could fly over rough country with some confidence. Turned out that push-pull is a bad idea unless you could have inflight adjustable props. The amount of prop blast from the front engine effects the amount of pitch required on the rear prop. And to pitch the props fine enough so that can fly on one engine, then they're too fine for cruise with both engines.... And besides, who wants to deal with TWO 2-strokes at once, one is more than enough....
I wanted to stop at a small outback town for fuel, but the proper airstrip was 3 miles out and not on a main road, so no chance of a ride in. I'd phoned the service station to ask if ultralights or gyros landed anywhere nearby. They use them for rounding up sheep out there. He said, yeh they land out on the side road and taxi in for fuel. so that's where I was looking to land.
I wanted to land right near the servo and did a precautionary circuit. The road was narrow with guide posts just wide enough, but a gusty hot x-wind made it very rough when I got down close, so I elected to go farther out where the road was wider and no guide posts. Unfortunately I extended my approach at power line height....
 
- Dumb thing to do, must always be either above or below power line height....... 
- And should have pulled up and done another precautionary circuit......
I just got a glimpse of the single wire as it flashed underneath, then felt that sickening deceleration as the wheels hooked on it...... Poured on full power to try to break the wire, but no chance of that. With that 80hp at high thrust line and the wheels  hooked down under, the aircraft  pitched forward instantly and hit the road vertical nose-down still at full power......
An almighty crunch then silence..... Then the tension in the wire pulled the aircraft back off the road into a shallow ditch. I sat there for a moment, surprised that I was still conscious, and checking for injuries. Only a sharp stinging sensation in one ankle. Then a drop of blood ran down my forehead and dripped off my nose.... Reached up and felt a wet gooey mess on the top of my head, and then I felt some real alarm..... But when I brought my hand down it was covered with green oil, the 2-stroke oil that I had stored up in the wing root, what a relief! The blood had come from a minor cut on my head.
Didn't smell any fuel, but thinking of fire decided to crawl out. Once again not real smart cause still hooked to the wire that could have been live..... But fortunately it had tripped the circuit breaker when it hit the ground..... Then sat down to think about the situation and made another mistake by sitting down in a patch of burrs .....
Soon a vehicle came by and radioed the police. While we were waiting the wire suddenly snapped tight and broke and whipped off through the brush.... Turned out that I'd stretched the wire and it had sagged a bit where it crossed the main highway not far away. Then a truck carrying a tall backhoe came along at speed and hooked the wire and dragged it about a kilometer until the driver realized what had happened and got stopped....
The policeman arrived and drove me to the hospital. He kept asking what I was going to do with the aircraft?? I wasn't worried cause it was in the ditch and I figured I'd be able to go out later and take it apart. I had noticed that the framework was broken between the BRS chute and the actuating handle so I was going to need an allen key to disconnect the handle before some movement pulled on the cable.  The doctor was out on a call so I had to sit to wait for him. Before the policeman left he had said, "...we'll sort it out..." Then I realized that when a country boy says that it means that, they're going to do something... I called the nurse and she called the police on the radio to tell them to leave it alone.... 
But he came back to say it was two minutes too late! He had gone and found a front end loader and conscripted a couple of the layabouts who hang around the pub all day, and they attempted to move the aircraft. They knew nothing about such aircraft, so they were very gingerly approaching it. With one man on each wing and tail they were carefully lifting it with the loader when the cable went tight and the BRS rocket went off! Those rockets go off with a loud blast and a cloud of smoke, and the billowing chute was bright orange, so the impression would have been a fuel explosion! The word is true that one man actually crapped his pants right away! And the other had never worked and lived on a disability pension because he claimed to have a bad heart, but now they reckon that if he survived that shock then his heart was okay. In the pub they still tease those guys about all that......
The policeman came back to the hospital to ask for my flying license. There was a phone number on there of the Recreational Flying Association that regulates our licensing, so he rang them. They were really good in those days, and told him they would look after it and just for me to phone them when I could, just the answer he wanted to hear cause it was then out of his hands so no paperwork.... He didn't know exactly what to do about the incident, but was trying to be considerate and helpful. So he reckoned that it was against the law to land on the road but he couldn't hardly charge me for crashing on the road so he didn't figure on doing anything, which suited me just fine.... Then he asked if I had insurance..... I told him that I didn't have any and would have to wear it on my own. to which he said, "...Oh dear..." and then left. 
I spent a couple of days in the local hospital with a shattered heel bone, which didn't hurt right at the time but sure gets painful later.... Finally a Flying Doctor flight was diverted to carry me to the city for surgery, etc, a heck of a lot better than a 5 hr road trip in that condition.
That's the last I heard about it, until news came back much later that they had charged the trucking company for carrying an over-height load without a permit and escort and made their insurance pay the damages. A month later when I finally was able to go back out there with a trailer to collect the remains of the aircraft, I noticed a lot of shiny new wire and insulators and all the undergrowth neatly cleared from under the power line...... And a white spot of fiberglass particles from the nose pod still embedded in the middle of the road......
A year later I heard from a friend who had been on a pig shooting trip out there, and that they're still telling this story in the pub, probably much embellished by now.......
p.s.- I got into this trouble by carelessness, but got out of it because of what I had done before the incident.  I'd very much strengthened the pilot protection. Originally the Beaver just had thin wall light aluminum tubing down in front of the pilot, but I replaced it with 3mm wall tubing with welded gussets to attach to the rest of the structure. And steel square section to join up underneath. Triangulated for strength. Some extra weight but worth every bit of it. Without it I would have been roadkill....

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John Hauck



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PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 7:24 am    Post subject: Flying Stories Reply with quote

That is a funny story, even funnier when John G tells it in person.  Thanks for sharing.  Good points to remember to help us stay safe. 

Soon after I started flying my Ultrastar I snagged a power line with the tail wheel.  It was about 1800 on a Wednesday evening.  Wives were home cooking supper, folks were getting home from work and getting cleaned up and some were watching the news on their TVs.  I put a stop to all that in a fraction of a second.

Here's how I did it.  Was flying back to my airstrip from a friend's airstrip along US231.  There is an old section of highway parallel to it.  Decided to make my first ever false approach to the old section, not intending to land.  There was a power line parallel to the old section of highway with a wire span running a couple hundred yards from the opposite side of the new road all the way across both sections of road.  Cleared myself over the wire.  I remember watching it pass under me, but did not see the top 7600 volt line.  It was twilight, that wire was the same color as the asphalt beneath it.  The wires I cleared myself across were black telephone wires.  Felt a tug, went full throttle and flew it until it stopped crashing.  Luckily there was a splice about 6 feet from where my tail wheel hooked the wire and it separated, but not before I pulled the main line loose a half mile away.  By that time I had quit flying and the Ultrastar crashed going down an embankment on the side of the road.  This helped break the impact.  I was fine except where my shins hit the underside of the little instrument pod.  Tore up my US pretty bad, but I was OK.  The bad part was twofold.  Not only had I knocked out all the power in the surrounding area, I blew up all three transformers at a well that provided water for the local water system.  My biggest worry now was having to pay for all the damage I caused.  I had no money.

A car stopped to see if they could help.  I asked for a ride to my airstrip where I could get my truck and a trailer to recover the US.  While I was gone all the local law enforcement, emergency crews, and gawkers arrived, but couldn't find the pilot.  They thought that I had been injured and wandered off into the woods. 

Took a while to get truck, trailer, and my old buddy, and get back to my airplane.  Got it broken down, loaded, and didn't go to jail.

This was in 1985.  I kept waiting to get the brown manila envelope notifying me that I had to pay for all the damage.  I was really worried, but the envelope never came and I never heard anything else about it except friends and neighbors teasing me pretty hard about hitting that wire.

Took a total rebuild on the US.  I learned an important lesson that John G mentioned.  Don't fly at power line height.  If you do, make sure you see all the wires before you descend.  That happened 32 years ago and I am still gun shy of power lines and fences.

Fly safe,

john h
mkIII
Titus, Alabama

From: owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com [mailto:owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com] On Behalf Of JC Gilpin
Sent: Monday, January 01, 2018 6:23 AM
To: kolb-list(at)matronics.com
Subject: Re: Flying Stories

Quote:



<When I made that comment, "you were good at getting into and out of trouble", I was thinking in particular, to the story you told of clipping a power line and the adventure that started after that. Very funny once in a lifetime story.>



Well, I guess that's bait enough to tell the story as it happened.....
Yeh, it did turn out funny in the end.....
And maybe remind others of precautions that need to be heeded.....


I'd converted a two-seat Beaver RX550 into a single-seat, twin engine push-pull arrangement, with two 447's. I was looking for redundancy so I could fly over rough country with some confidence. Turned out that push-pull is a bad idea unless you could have inflight adjustable props. The amount of prop blast from the front engine effects the amount of pitch required on the rear prop. And to pitch the props fine enough so that can fly on one engine, then they're too fine for cruise with both engines.... And besides, who wants to deal with TWO 2-strokes at once, one is more than enough....



I wanted to stop at a small outback town for fuel, but the proper airstrip was 3 miles out and not on a main road, so no chance of a ride in. I'd phoned the service station to ask if ultralights or gyros landed anywhere nearby. They use them for rounding up sheep out there. He said, yeh they land out on the side road and taxi in for fuel. so that's where I was looking to land.



I wanted to land right near the servo and did a precautionary circuit. The road was narrow with guide posts just wide enough, but a gusty hot x-wind made it very rough when I got down close, so I elected to go farther out where the road was wider and no guide posts. Unfortunately I extended my approach at power line height.....



- Dumb thing to do, must always be either above or below power line height.......

- And should have pulled up and done another precautionary circuit......



I just got a glimpse of the single wire as it flashed underneath, then felt that sickening deceleration as the wheels hooked on it...... Poured on full power to try to break the wire, but no chance of that. With that 80hp at high thrust line and the wheels hooked down under, the aircraft pitched forward instantly and hit the road vertical nose-down still at full power......



An almighty crunch then silence..... Then the tension in the wire pulled the aircraft back off the road into a shallow ditch. I sat there for a moment, surprised that I was still conscious, and checking for injuries. Only a sharp stinging sensation in one ankle. Then a drop of blood ran down my forehead and dripped off my nose.... Reached up and felt a wet gooey mess on the top of my head, and then I felt some real alarm..... But when I brought my hand down it was covered with green oil, the 2-stroke oil that I had stored up in the wing root, what a relief! The blood had come from a minor cut on my head.



Didn't smell any fuel, but thinking of fire decided to crawl out. Once again not real smart cause still hooked to the wire that could have been live..... But fortunately it had tripped the circuit breaker when it hit the ground..... Then sat down to think about the situation and made another mistake by sitting down in a patch of burrs ....



Soon a vehicle came by and radioed the police. While we were waiting the wire suddenly snapped tight and broke and whipped off through the brush.... Turned out that I'd stretched the wire and it had sagged a bit where it crossed the main highway not far away. Then a truck carrying a tall backhoe came along at speed and hooked the wire and dragged it about a kilometer until the driver realized what had happened and got stopped....



The policeman arrived and drove me to the hospital. He kept asking what I was going to do with the aircraft?? I wasn't worried cause it was in the ditch and I figured I'd be able to go out later and take it apart. I had noticed that the framework was broken between the BRS chute and the actuating handle so I was going to need an allen key to disconnect the handle before some movement pulled on the cable. The doctor was out on a call so I had to sit to wait for him. Before the policeman left he had said, "...we'll sort it out..." Then I realized that when a country boy says that it means that, they're going to do something... I called the nurse and she called the police on the radio to tell them to leave it alone....



But he came back to say it was two minutes too late! He had gone and found a front end loader and conscripted a couple of the layabouts who hang around the pub all day, and they attempted to move the aircraft. They knew nothing about such aircraft, so they were very gingerly approaching it. With one man on each wing and tail they were carefully lifting it with the loader when the cable went tight and the BRS rocket went off! Those rockets go off with a loud blast and a cloud of smoke, and the billowing chute was bright orange, so the impression would have been a fuel explosion! The word is true that one man actually crapped his pants right away! And the other had never worked and lived on a disability pension because he claimed to have a bad heart, but now they reckon that if he survived that shock then his heart was okay. In the pub they still tease those guys about all that......



The policeman came back to the hospital to ask for my flying license. There was a phone number on there of the Recreational Flying Association that regulates our licensing, so he rang them. They were really good in those days, and told him they would look after it and just for me to phone them when I could, just the answer he wanted to hear cause it was then out of his hands so no paperwork.... He didn't know exactly what to do about the incident, but was trying to be considerate and helpful. So he reckoned that it was against the law to land on the road but he couldn't hardly charge me for crashing on the road so he didn't figure on doing anything, which suited me just fine.... Then he asked if I had insurance..... I told him that I didn't have any and would have to wear it on my own. to which he said, "...Oh dear..." and then left.



I spent a couple of days in the local hospital with a shattered heel bone, which didn't hurt right at the time but sure gets painful later.... Finally a Flying Doctor flight was diverted to carry me to the city for surgery, etc, a heck of a lot better than a 5 hr road trip in that condition.



That's the last I heard about it, until news came back much later that they had charged the trucking company for carrying an over-height load without a permit and escort and made their insurance pay the damages. A month later when I finally was able to go back out there with a trailer to collect the remains of the aircraft, I noticed a lot of shiny new wire and insulators and all the undergrowth neatly cleared from under the power line...... And a white spot of fiberglass particles from the nose pod still embedded in the middle of the road......



A year later I heard from a friend who had been on a pig shooting trip out there, and that they're still telling this story in the pub, probably much embellished by now.......



p.s.- I got into this trouble by carelessness, but got out of it because of what I had done before the incident. I'd very much strengthened the pilot protection. Originally the Beaver just had thin wall light aluminum tubing down in front of the pilot, but I replaced it with 3mm wall tubing with welded gussets to attach to the rest of the structure. And steel square section to join up underneath. Triangulated for strength. Some extra weight but worth every bit of it. Without it I would have been roadkill.....



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John Hauck
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hauck's holler
Titus, Alabama
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 7:40 am    Post subject: Flying Stories Reply with quote

Great stories, from both John's.  Thanks Robert Lobdell
Waskom, Texas

Flying is the second greatest thill known to man.  Landing is the first!

On Jan 1, 2018 9:26 AM, "John Hauck" <jhauck(at)elmore.rr.com (jhauck(at)elmore.rr.com)> wrote:
Quote:

That is a funny story, even funnier when John G tells it in person.  Thanks for sharing.  Good points to remember to help us stay safe. 
 
Soon after I started flying my Ultrastar I snagged a power line with the tail wheel.  It was about 1800 on a Wednesday evening.  Wives were home cooking supper, folks were getting home from work and getting cleaned up and some were watching the news on their TVs.  I put a stop to all that in a fraction of a second.
 
Here's how I did it.  Was flying back to my airstrip from a friend's airstrip along US231.  There is an old section of highway parallel to it.  Decided to make my first ever false approach to the old section, not intending to land.  There was a power line parallel to the old section of highway with a wire span running a couple hundred yards from the opposite side of the new road all the way across both sections of road.  Cleared myself over the wire.  I remember watching it pass under me, but did not see the top 7600 volt line.  It was twilight, that wire was the same color as the asphalt beneath it.  The wires I cleared myself across were black telephone wires.  Felt a tug, went full throttle and flew it until it stopped crashing.  Luckily there was a splice about 6 feet from where my tail wheel hooked the wire and it separated, but not before I pulled the main line loose a half mile away.  By that time I had quit flying and the Ultrastar crashed going down an embankment on the side of the road.  This helped break the impact.  I was fine except where my shins hit the underside of the little instrument pod.  Tore up my US pretty bad, but I was OK.  The bad part was twofold.  Not only had I knocked out all the power in the surrounding area, I blew up all three transformers at a well that provided water for the local water system.  My biggest worry now was having to pay for all the damage I caused.  I had no money.
 
A car stopped to see if they could help.  I asked for a ride to my airstrip where I could get my truck and a trailer to recover the US.  While I was gone all the local law enforcement, emergency crews, and gawkers arrived, but couldn't find the pilot.  They thought that I had been injured and wandered off into the woods. 
 
Took a while to get truck, trailer, and my old buddy, and get back to my airplane.  Got it broken down, loaded, and didn't go to jail.
 
This was in 1985.  I kept waiting to get the brown manila envelope notifying me that I had to pay for all the damage.  I was really worried, but the envelope never came and I never heard anything else about it except friends and neighbors teasing me pretty hard about hitting that wire.
 
Took a total rebuild on the US.  I learned an important lesson that John G mentioned.  Don't fly at power line height.  If you do, make sure you see all the wires before you descend.  That happened 32 years ago and I am still gun shy of power lines and fences.
 
Fly safe,
 
john h
mkIII
Titus, Alabama
 
From: owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com (owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com) [mailto:owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com (owner-kolb-list-server(at)matronics.com)] On Behalf Of JC Gilpin
Sent: Monday, January 01, 2018 6:23 AM
To: kolb-list(at)matronics.com (kolb-list(at)matronics.com)
Subject: Re: Flying Stories

 
Quote:



<When I made that comment, "you were good at getting into and out of trouble", I was thinking in particular, to the story you told of clipping a power line and the adventure that started after that. Very funny once in a lifetime story.>

 

Well, I guess that's bait enough to tell the story as it happened..... 
Yeh, it did turn out funny in the end.....
And maybe remind others of precautions that need to be heeded.....
 

I'd converted a two-seat Beaver RX550 into a single-seat, twin engine push-pull arrangement, with two 447's. I was looking for redundancy so I could fly over rough country with some confidence. Turned out that push-pull is a bad idea unless you could have inflight adjustable props. The amount of prop blast from the front engine effects the amount of pitch required on the rear prop. And to pitch the props fine enough so that can fly on one engine, then they're too fine for cruise with both engines.... And besides, who wants to deal with TWO 2-strokes at once, one is more than enough....

 

I wanted to stop at a small outback town for fuel, but the proper airstrip was 3 miles out and not on a main road, so no chance of a ride in. I'd phoned the service station to ask if ultralights or gyros landed anywhere nearby. They use them for rounding up sheep out there. He said, yeh they land out on the side road and taxi in for fuel. so that's where I was looking to land.

 

I wanted to land right near the servo and did a precautionary circuit. The road was narrow with guide posts just wide enough, but a gusty hot x-wind made it very rough when I got down close, so I elected to go farther out where the road was wider and no guide posts. Unfortunately I extended my approach at power line height.....

 

- Dumb thing to do, must always be either above or below power line height....... 

- And should have pulled up and done another precautionary circuit......

 

I just got a glimpse of the single wire as it flashed underneath, then felt that sickening deceleration as the wheels hooked on it...... Poured on full power to try to break the wire, but no chance of that. With that 80hp at high thrust line and the wheels  hooked down under, the aircraft  pitched forward instantly and hit the road vertical nose-down still at full power......

 

An almighty crunch then silence..... Then the tension in the wire pulled the aircraft back off the road into a shallow ditch. I sat there for a moment, surprised that I was still conscious, and checking for injuries. Only a sharp stinging sensation in one ankle. Then a drop of blood ran down my forehead and dripped off my nose.... Reached up and felt a wet gooey mess on the top of my head, and then I felt some real alarm..... But when I brought my hand down it was covered with green oil, the 2-stroke oil that I had stored up in the wing root, what a relief! The blood had come from a minor cut on my head.

 

Didn't smell any fuel, but thinking of fire decided to crawl out. Once again not real smart cause still hooked to the wire that could have been live..... But fortunately it had tripped the circuit breaker when it hit the ground..... Then sat down to think about the situation and made another mistake by sitting down in a patch of burrs .....

 

Soon a vehicle came by and radioed the police. While we were waiting the wire suddenly snapped tight and broke and whipped off through the brush.... Turned out that I'd stretched the wire and it had sagged a bit where it crossed the main highway not far away. Then a truck carrying a tall backhoe came along at speed and hooked the wire and dragged it about a kilometer until the driver realized what had happened and got stopped....

 

The policeman arrived and drove me to the hospital. He kept asking what I was going to do with the aircraft?? I wasn't worried cause it was in the ditch and I figured I'd be able to go out later and take it apart. I had noticed that the framework was broken between the BRS chute and the actuating handle so I was going to need an allen key to disconnect the handle before some movement pulled on the cable.  The doctor was out on a call so I had to sit to wait for him. Before the policeman left he had said, "...we'll sort it out..." Then I realized that when a country boy says that it means that, they're going to do something... I called the nurse and she called the police on the radio to tell them to leave it alone.... 

 

But he came back to say it was two minutes too late! He had gone and found a front end loader and conscripted a couple of the layabouts who hang around the pub all day, and they attempted to move the aircraft. They knew nothing about such aircraft, so they were very gingerly approaching it. With one man on each wing and tail they were carefully lifting it with the loader when the cable went tight and the BRS rocket went off! Those rockets go off with a loud blast and a cloud of smoke, and the billowing chute was bright orange, so the impression would have been a fuel explosion! The word is true that one man actually crapped his pants right away! And the other had never worked and lived on a disability pension because he claimed to have a bad heart, but now they reckon that if he survived that shock then his heart was okay. In the pub they still tease those guys about all that......

 

The policeman came back to the hospital to ask for my flying license. There was a phone number on there of the Recreational Flying Association that regulates our licensing, so he rang them. They were really good in those days, and told him they would look after it and just for me to phone them when I could, just the answer he wanted to hear cause it was then out of his hands so no paperwork.... He didn't know exactly what to do about the incident, but was trying to be considerate and helpful. So he reckoned that it was against the law to land on the road but he couldn't hardly charge me for crashing on the road so he didn't figure on doing anything, which suited me just fine.... Then he asked if I had insurance..... I told him that I didn't have any and would have to wear it on my own. to which he said, "...Oh dear..." and then left. 

 

I spent a couple of days in the local hospital with a shattered heel bone, which didn't hurt right at the time but sure gets painful later.... Finally a Flying Doctor flight was diverted to carry me to the city for surgery, etc, a heck of a lot better than a 5 hr road trip in that condition.

 

That's the last I heard about it, until news came back much later that they had charged the trucking company for carrying an over-height load without a permit and escort and made their insurance pay the damages. A month later when I finally was able to go back out there with a trailer to collect the remains of the aircraft, I noticed a lot of shiny new wire and insulators and all the undergrowth neatly cleared from under the power line..... And a white spot of fiberglass particles from the nose pod still embedded in the middle of the road......

 

A year later I heard from a friend who had been on a pig shooting trip out there, and that they're still telling this story in the pub, probably much embellished by now.......

 

p.s.- I got into this trouble by carelessness, but got out of it because of what I had done before the incident.  I'd very much strengthened the pilot protection. Originally the Beaver just had thin wall light aluminum tubing down in front of the pilot, but I replaced it with 3mm wall tubing with welded gussets to attach to the rest of the structure. And steel square section to join up underneath. Triangulated for strength. Some extra weight but worth every bit of it. Without it I would have been roadkill.....

 

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Richard Pike



Joined: 09 Jan 2006
Posts: 1433
Location: Blountville, Tennessee

PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 1:35 pm    Post subject: Re: Flying stories Reply with quote

John G - John H: God bless you both and thank you both for starting out New Years Day 2018 with 2 great stories. My wife was out in the dining room and yelled back at me "What are you laughing at so hard?"

I gotta share these with my buds. Thanks again.


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John Hauck



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Location: Titus, Alabama (hauck's holler)

PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 2:32 pm    Post subject: Flying stories Reply with quote

I feel fortunate I could remember that far back. Wink

Glad you all enjoyed.

Again, I wish you could hear this Aussie share the story about the power
line. It'll make you laugh
'til you cry.

john h
Titus, Alabama


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